Judge Spotlight

Max Yampolsky, Founder, Hammer + Nail

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Max Yampolsky

Founder, Hammer + Nail

Max Yampolsky founded design-centric production company Hammer + Nail and serves as its Creative Director, Producer, and Director. He started his career in the black boxes of NYC’s Off-Broadway theaters, and later moved to commercials, documentaries and narratives, shows, and digital media. Equal parts creative and analytical, his sweet spot is revitalizing brands and building useful, bespoke products with a social touch.

Max enjoys drawing with charcoal, writing screenplays, riding skateboards (he’s goofy), and volunteering for kids-related causes.

What video/television piece inspired you recently?

High Maintenance. I can’t think of a current show that’s more precisely in sync with its method of characterization—and it went from Vimeo to HBO in about three years. The main character isn’t The Guy, the likeable weed dealer the show follows, it’s New York City or the customers that share one bond. It’s through The Guy’s eyes that we view the intimate lives of people and how they cope with their surroundings, which many of us can relate to. The writing is as tight as you’ll ever see.

The stories are less about marijuana and more about the people that use, and their honest stories with concise, digestible plot lines. What struck me most was that we’re made to embrace the exact moment we’re experiencing on screen, rather than traditional character reveals. That’s original and human. I mean talk about amazing interactive content! 

What is most exciting for you at the moment within your industry?  

Films during Hollywood’s second Golden Era did that: Easy Rider, Midnight Cowboy and Taxi Driver etc. We’re now starting to see that energy and authenticity resurface.

Shows like High Maintenance and films like Good Time and First Reformed might not have been green-lit ten years ago, and are pushing the needle. In design, we are also going back to what worked well, taking its essence, and applying it to modern day, digital society. Look at UX/UI these days, and you’ll see many sites with hero images containing bold, beautiful photography and elegant, subtle typography over it. There’s less smoke and mirrors, and more the experience of a truthful moment. To me, that’s pretty cool.

What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you?  

Aside from Hammer + Nail, our design-focused production company, I live a double life as a screenwriter and am working on a feature film called The Freelancer. It’s about a graphic designer that suffers an existential crisis when she loses her imagination and tries to get it back while seeking meaning in the world. It’s a story of self-acceptance—you’ll have to see the film one day.

What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on?

Each piece of work we produce is a blessing. It’s gratifying when a client trusts you with their money, time, and reputation. However, I will say it’s a mini-doc titled Bridget’s Story. The piece is about a girl—profiled in the NY Times—who beat insurmountable odds after her father died of an overdose, her mother became addicted to crack, and she lived on the the streets in the South Bronx while losing many friends to gun violence. Eight years later, she attends college and works with the New York Yankees to help troubled youth attain employment.

I feel it’s a piece that withstands the test of time and inspires others to keep pushing towards what we all strive for: happiness.

Judge Spotlight

Tobey Lindback  VFX Supervisor, MPC NY

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Torbjorn “Tobey” Lindback

 VFX Supervisor, MPC NY

At MPC New York City, Tobey works as a VFX Supervisor at MPC New York. Tobey Lindback began his career as a 3D artist while attending school in Sweden, and soon after specialized in compositing after seven years as a 3D generalist. He has worked for renowned studios and on highly recognized projects across Sweden, the UK, and the US. His relationships with companies like Fido, Jellyfish Pictures, Nexus, and more Analog and The Mill, has allowed him to work with clients, from Nike, to Heineken, to Mercedes, and beyond. Having worked mostly on high profile TV commercials, Tobey is a proud member of The Visual Effects Society and British Academy of Film and Television Arts.

What piece of video/television has recently inspired you?

I recently watched Mindhunter, in which you embark on a journey to dark places you don’t get a glimpse of too often. I’m a sucker for biographies—books, films and documentaries, so I found this show quite captivating. Also, I recently watched a documentary called “Tickled,” and if you haven’t seen it, you should. It’s a story that gets more strange as you go, and has a surprise around every corner!

What is most exciting for you at the moment within your industry?

Keeping up with all things new in every area—at least in the Visual Effects industry—is a job on its own. However, it’s interesting to see where VR is heading. I believe we haven’t seen everything yet and there is so much in that world that has yet to be explored. When I was a young 3D artist, people talked about GPU rendering, saying “wait until that’s here.” It’s here now, and moving fast. There is so much brilliant work out there.

What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you?

I play drums in the coolest band in New York City: Sister Thieves. Also, I used to be able to do splits, but that’s all in the past!

What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on?

There are so many that are unique in their own way. I’ve been a part of many award winning and nominated projects over the course of my career, from The Telly Awards, VES, Ciclope, AEAF and more, and I naturally feel proud of those. However, I’m quite proud of the cinematic trailer we did here at MPC New York last year for the game “Shadow of War,” which consisted of 120+ shots that we completed for a long, multi-platform epic piece. The game is a success and so was our work and I’m proud of everyone involved on that job.

Judge Spotlight

Lee Simpson, Head of TV & Entertainment, ustwo

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Lee Simpson

Head of TV & Entertainment, ustwo

Currently based in LA, Lee Simpson is ustwo’s Head of TV and Entertainment where he currently oversees the strategic direction and delivery of ustwo’s work in the TV and entertainment industry. Developing partnerships with companies such as Comcast, Warner Bros., NBCUniversal and Netflix, he leads a dedicated team focused on exploring innovative products and experiences that help solve the complex challenges in the media and video content space.

What video/television piece inspired you recently? 
I’m constantly inspired by the work that Netflix are doing. They’ve built a platform that is giving creative freedom and exposure to creators in a way thats never been done at this scale before. The fact that they’re taking a risk with shows like Master of None and Disjointed is driving the whole industry forward.
Netflix are also doing some interesting things on the interactive content front. They’ve been experimenting with choose-your-own-adventure kids shows like Buddy Thunderstruck and Puss In Boots which are both amazing. I love that they’ve taken a relatively simple mechanic and applied it to linear content in a way that completely changes how you engage with the show. It would have been awesome to have shows like this when I was a kid.
What is most exciting for you at the moment within your industry?
I like that people are finally taking risks. Aside from a few mavericks here and there, the TV and entertainment industry has gone on relatively untouched for 60+ years. Now creators and media organizations are realizing the full potential of technology, and leveraging it to reach new audiences and tell better stories.
And part of taking risks is that not everything will work. A lot of this is about experimenting with new technologies and formats, and there will be failures but at the end of the day, thats OK. The main thing is that people are trying new things, and fresh ideas are starting to rise to the surface — the face of the TV landscape is changing for the better.
What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you? 
In a previous life I was an art galley manager specializing in street art and graffiti. I spent almost three years managing artists and curating shows in my home town of Newcastle (UK) which has a pretty solid graffiti scene.
What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on?
I spent a year at The Guardian newspaper working on editorial workflow tools and content management systems for journalists, basically enabling more efficient reporting, both online and offline. It was during their coverage of the NSA’s and GCHQ’s worldwide electronic surveillance program and the same year we won a Pulitzer Prize. It felt like we were working for an important cause.
I’m also proud of the work that I’ve done at ustwo. They’ve given me the freedom to build up our media and entertainment practice and supported me when I wanted to bring that from New York to LA. I’ve had the chance to work with some awesome clients over the past 4 years and I’ve learned a lot — it’s a pretty special place to work.

Judge Spotlight

Christian Caldwell, Chief Creative Officer, McCann Worldgroup

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Christian Caldwell

VP Chief Creative Officer, McCann Worldgroup, Lima

McCann Worldgroup, Lima’s Christian Caldwell began his career over 15 years ago, and in 2011 was appointed by the prestigious Ibero-American advertising magazine, ADLATINA, as one of the top 20 Ibero-American creative directors of the decade.

Both as a writer and creative director, Christian has been honored with more than 700 recognitions at top advertising festivals across Asia, Europe, and the Americas, including Cannes (where he won seven Lions), The D&AD Awards, The Clio Awards, The London International Awards, The ANDYs, The Webby Awards, FIAP, El Sol, El Ojo, New York Festival, The WAVE Awards, and The Effie Awards.

What is most exciting for you at the moment within your industry?

Every day, I’m motivated by working in an industry in which millions of people can view my work, and I can provoke a positive reaction in them. There is nothing better than creating an advertising idea that becomes a part of popular culture.

What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you?

I am passionate about this profession! Since I was nine years old, I knew I wanted to be in advertising when I grew up.

What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on?

It’s impossible to say which piece of work made me feel the most proud; it’s like choosing between your kids. Some work has given me creative awards or recognitions, while others that have never won a prize have become a part of pop culture. In the end, any idea presented to the client, approved, and released is something I’m proud of.

Judge Spotlight

Sam Morrill Director of Curation, Vimeo

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Sam Morrill

Director of Curation, Vimeo

Sam Morrill joined Vimeo in 2009 where he currently serves as its Director of Curation, leading Vimeo’s five-person Curation Team. From customer support, content acquisitions, to curating Vimeo’s lauded Staff Picks channel, Sam has experienced Vimeo’s growth and evolution from a variety of different angles. In 2016, he led the launch of Vimeo Staff Pick Premieres, a weekly program in which the most celebrated short films from the festival circuit premiere online exclusively on Vimeo. When he’s not watching videos, you can find Sam traveling, watching baseball or searching for the last golf ball he hit into the woods. Sam resides in his hometown of Brooklyn, New York.

What video/ television piece inspired you recently?  

This week Rian Johnson, the director of ‘The Last Jedi’, uploaded a raw video of John Williams conducting his orchestra while recording the Star Wars theme for the new movie (https://vimeo.com/252417024). On Vimeo Staff Picks it’s super rare that we feature raw, unedited clips, but there’s something so magical about seeing John Williams bring such an iconic score to life. Maybe this is painfully obvious to most people, but I find it incredible how beautiful the music sounds even when captured through what I’m assuming was Johnson’s iPhone. It’s just crazy to me to think of that score as diegetic sound, which is what it was in the context of this video. I also love the fact that Johnson uploaded it directly to his personal Vimeo account.

What is most exciting for you at the moment within your industry?

I’m a pretty political person, so I like the fact that we’re returning to an era of overtly political filmmaking. Not that I always agree with what filmmakers are saying, but I appreciate that people are putting themselves out there and exposing themselves to the criticism inherent in making a political statement so publicly. Whereas for years it felt like artists shied away from getting political for fear of alienating the audience. Those concerns seem to have largely gone by the wayside.

What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you? 

I’m ambidextrous and my grandfather was a carny from the Bronx.

What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on?

I’m most proud of the work that we’ve done at Vimeo over the course of the 8+ years that I’ve been with the company. In particular, I’m proud of the growth of the reputation of Vimeo Staff Picks. What began as this fun side project for us at Vimeo has morphed into a really exciting program that has launched the careers of many up-and-coming filmmakers throughout the industry. I feel like we’ve played an integral part in legitimizing online distribution (of shorts in particular) within the industry and the festival scene. Because of platforms like Vimeo Staff Picks, releasing your work online is no longer seen as subordinate to traditional methods of distribution. In fact, many filmmakers now aspire to release their work online.

Judge Spotlight

Jake Sally, Director of Immersive Development, RYOT

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Jake Sally

Director of Immersive Development, RYOT
At RYOT, Jake spearheads development of immersive content designed to expand and explore the human experience across the full range of emerging platforms. Jake began work at WME-IMG in the Motion Picture Literature Department, where he learned how to transition indie-darling writers and directors into commercial Hollywood. After years refining his knowledge of narrative storytelling, Jake transitioned to Hasbro Studios. While at Hasbro, Jake’s career became focused on activating Hasbro’s massive portfolio of IP, ranging from TRANSFORMERS to G.I. JOE, across TV, film, toys, digital and licensing. Spotting the rise of commercially available virtual reality in 2014, he brought his knowledge of brands and storytelling to Two Bit Circus. While at Two Bit Circus, he helped formalize their VR Department, managed development for original content and lent his creative vision to commercial work for clients ranging from Google to Fox.

What video/ television/VR piece inspired you recently? 

Netflix’s new movie BRIGHT. It’s not a perfect movie, but in an age where most content is a reboot, sequel or derivative it’s incredible to see something that’s not only wholly original, but also something that’s far outside the norm. Smashing together END OF WATCH and LORD OF THE RINGS to get BRIGHT is incredible. That maverick mentality is what we need in the immersive space, these new mediums need and deserve an entirely new wave of stories that are outside anything we’ve seen before. 

What is most exciting for you at the moment within your industry?

Haptics, haptics, haptics. Sound and vision in VR have finally gotten to a point where you’re able to lose yourself in the moment, but adding the haptic element is going to take everything to the next level. Whether it’s HaptX new gloves or running around in The Void, we are on the precipice of immersion beyond anything experienced previously.

What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you? 

My favorite book is Gone with the Wind – there’s nothing I find more compelling than a love story that transcends time and place.

What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on? 

I’m executive producing an incredible cinematic 360 piece that’s heading to Sundance 2018 called DINNER PARTY. From the creatives to the production team, everyone has poured their heart and soul into this piece. Working in an industry that’s just finding its footing, projects like DINNER PARTY are an important and constant reminder to make what you love — otherwise you might as well go work a 9 to 5.

Judge Spotlight

Lauren Lumsden, Site Director – The Scene at Condé Nast Entertainment

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Lauren Lumsden

Site Director, The Scene at Condé Nast Entertainment

What video/television piece inspired you recently?

Right now, I am an avid fan of Netflix’s Chef’s Table. It’s a documentary series about famous chefs from around the world. The show honestly— and beautifully—portrays the difficulties and joys of their profession. Plus, I salivate over the food they’re making the entire time I’m watching. I am not a foodie, but now I am planning trips to Italy and Korea just to eat meals made by two of the chefs, Massimo Bottura and Jeong Kwan.

On the video front, I was incredibly moved by Tracee Ellis Ross’s speech from Glamour’s Women of the Year Summit. It’s inspiring to know that her video is being passed around the digital community, and will live beyond the event.

What is most exciting for you at the moment within your industry?

The increasing accessibility of video production is very exciting as it opens new doors in the industry. When I first started making videos in college, I had a heavy video camera that required chunky tapes—and, moreover, shot footage that didn’t look great. These days, my phone shoots better videos, and the editing software is significantly more intuitive and user-friendly. Thanks to that ease and ubiquity, more and more people can make short films, tell their amazing stories, and learn to love the genre as much as I do. Just last week, I saw a video that a freshman in college shot about the loneliness she was experiencing in her first year away from home. I was so moved. Similarly, I want my teams at The Scene and Glamour to feel empowered to tell their stories this way, and not feel limited by imperfect lighting or cameras.

In fact, Glamour is adopting this LoFi-but-still-impactful approach to video with “30 Days to Greatness,” a series about one woman’s attempt to learn to do something new in a month. The footage is largely filmed on her camera phone. Stories feel drastically more real and personal when the person you’re watching isn’t perfectly lit and coiffed.

What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you?

I have been keeping a diary since I was 5 years old—so I can easily flip to a page and tell you exactly what I was doing on this day in 1989. I’ve always been obsessed with documenting things, people, and feelings, which is why I got into journalism and filmmaking. Another interesting note about me is that I’ve watched every video on the Internet—every, single one.

What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on?

I am most proud to have worked on The Scene, and to have played a role in what the platform is now and what it will be moving forward. I’m obsessed with my team of geniuses, who keep me in a permanent state of awe with their ideas, dedication, and talent. Evolving The Scene has been the highlight of my career. and it has felt very personal at times. Watching our videos go viral, and working with people who are as passionate about the mission as I am, makes every challenge worth it.  

 

Judge Spotlight

Nigel Lopez-McBean, Engagement Director, Donut (Duplass Productions)

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Nigel Lopez Mc-Bean

Engagement Director, Donut (Duplass Productions)

Donut is The Duplass Brothers creative shop, creating entertainment-led content for brands bringing an indie sensibility to new audiences. Donut has been named by Fast Company as one of the most innovative companies of 2017 and is Snap Inc/NBC Universal’s first ever partner for scripted content. Nigel is a graduate of Middlesex University, University of London and started his career at the BBC. He spends his time annoyed at being regularly schooled at card games by his 4 year old son, James.


What video/television piece inspired you recently?

HBO’s Insecure & Amazon’s Transparent. They’re fantastic examples of work portraying LA communities giving viewers access into issues of race, culture and gender in a smart, entertaining way without losing its bite. Both shows are beautifully shot and cleverly written, whilst being intensely personal stories delivered by show runners who clearly really care. There’s a lot to be learned from both.

I’ll also call out Mark and Jay’s ‘Room 104’ for HBO which bizarrely made me realize how much I enjoy modern dance and I’ve been down a late-night YouTube rabbit hole ever since.

What is most exciting for you at the moment within your industry?

I’m enjoying how valued creators have become and how many different avenues now exist to tell a story. The mash-up of entertainment, platforms and advertising is a fun place to be and crucially, nobody really knows where we’re going to end up or who the winners will be. Right now, creators & audiences are both winning which is kind of cool.

I’ve also got a deep interest in issues around diversity and it’s exciting there’s finally genuine acknowledgement things simply have to improve and quickly. So much talent is being wasted.

What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you?

I’m obsessed with Motorcycling. It’s addictive and meditative. The danger/adrenalin element just makes it all the more fun.

What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on?

I’m currently living the project I’m most proud of – Donut.

Judge Spotlight

Juliette Geraghty, Group Creative Director, VaynerMedia

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Juliette Geraghty

Group Creative Director, VaynerMedia

As a key leader at VaynerMediaJuliette Geraghty helped grow the office from 25 employees to 65+ in just under a year. She currently leads a creative team of 20 talented hustlers across CPG, auto, and entertainment brands such as Mattel, Noosa Yoghurt, Toyota, and Turner, to name a few.

Juliette’s expertise is creating breakthrough content and experiences rooted in human truth and cultural relevance, as well as creative strategy and partnerships with emerging platforms such as Amazon Alexa. In 2017, Business Insider honored her as one of “30 Most Creative Women in Advertising.” Juliette is inspired daily by her loving, talented husband Dave and their fierce four-year-old daughter Clover Mimi.

 


 

What video/television piece inspired you recently?

American Gods has really intrigued me. I’ve never seen anything like it. The overarching message of dying gods needing humans to believe in them in order to survive is such a compelling comment on the world we live in today. The character development is paced perfectly. Visually, I’m floored by this series—again, it’s not like anything I’ve ever seen. I’d love to spend time in the minds of the show’s creators to see what they see! The Handmaid’s Tale is another show I can’t stop watching. Its timing with what’s going on in our country with women’s rights is eerily too close to home—it’s actually quite terrifying.

What is most exciting for you at the moment within your industry?

I’m really pumped about voice (connected home devices) and its integration across multiple platforms. I’ve been working with the Amazon Alexa team on a few projects, and smart speakers are opening doors to a completely new way for consumers to experience content, entertainment, and just life in general. I’ve also had a longstanding love for augmented reality over the last 10 years. Snapchat obviously has made great strides in this area, but we are definitely just scratching the surface. There is so much utility that brands can bring to their consumers with AR. I’m really hoping to be a part of that push to the next level.

What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you?

The one thing the Telly Awards community should know about me is that I have a 21-year-old cat by the name of Lucky Lou. Anyone who knows me knows him, so I guess the Telly community should, too! Lucky has flown in first class, drove across the country three times, and has even camped on a beach. Everyone probably refers to me as the crazy cat lady, but I will proudly shout from the rooftops that Lucky rules.

What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on?

I have so many projects that I’m insanely proud about. Mainly because of all of the wonderful people behind these projects. I really, really love the people I work with—so I am officially most proud of them.

As far as something we made together, I would have to go with Sadie the Eagle. We were working with 20th Century Fox at the time to help promote their new film, Eddie the Eagle, based on the 1988 Olympic British skier. We wanted to create a video that helped make his story relevant with today’s audience in the U.S. After testing some content themes in social, we decided to go with a documentary that tells a real life underdog story—and that’s how we found Sadie.

Our documentary tells the story of this young, fierce snowboarder that continuously overcomes tough financial circumstances to chase her dream of being an Olympian. Not only did we pay for Sadie to compete in the Nationals, we also introduced her to her lifelong hero Bud Keene. With the enormous exposure from our video, and all of these amazing doors we opened for Sadie, that is definitely one project where we changed an incredible girl’s path in life.

Judge Spotlight

Sarah Dale, Chief Creative Officer, Donut

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Sarah Dale

Chief Creative Officer, Donut

Sarah Dale has spent most of her career on the sales side of B2B publishing with ten years at The Wall Street Journal. There she was the VP of Digital and Content running WSJ Custom Studios, as well as strategy for all digital and content revenue. She’s credited with transforming WSJ’s Studio from a legacy print operation to a formidable competitor in the digital native space. In her tenure, the studio’s revenue quadrupled, renewals shot to the best in the industry and the team won many awards including a Cannes Lion, D&AD Pencils and many Tellys.

In 2016, she left the WSJ to begin her own successful consulting business, but after a year, couldn’t resist a Donut. She’s now Chief Commercial Officer for the Duplass Brothers’ creative shop, Donut, opening their new East Coast operations just this past January.  She lives in northern Westchester “just where NY gets a little bit country” with her husband and two “very sassy” daughters and plans on getting chickens this Spring.


 

What video / television piece inspired you recently?

Amazon recently did a number of pieces for Echo that are brilliant. They tell a compelling story in 10 seconds that make you want to watch the next one — while getting across the product perfectly. They’re simple and incredibly creative.

What is most exciting for you at the moment within your industry?

I think that brands are starting to really understand they have to be authentic in order to be heard and seen. That’s going to produce much more interesting brand creative moving forward.

What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you?

 I actively try to convince others that excessive swearing and overuse of analogies are signs of a higher intelligence.

What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on?

Cocainenomics for Netflix for many reasons, but most of all because it catapulted the team I ran at WSJ to a world-class studio. In its longer version, it’s really a story of an underdog team banding together with their unique talents to make a miracle happen. It also kicked off a two-year period of over 70 awards and almost 400% growth in revenue because of how that team operated from that moment on. So, I say I’m proud of the work – but I’m really proud of the team.

Judge Spotlight

Ian Weiss, Director of Digital Strategy, American Theatre Wing

Our Q&A with Telly Jury Council Member Ian Weiss

Director of Digital Strategy, American Theatre Wing

Ian Weiss has developed digital strategy and content for Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Live Entertainment over the last eight years at the American Theatre Wing, Serino Coyne, and Art Meets Commerce. He has won two Webby Awards for his social strategy on the 2015 Tony Awards and was a 2014 Webby Honoree for his work on the Tony Awards Second Screen companion site. In addition, he was nominated for a 2017 Daytime Emmy Award and 2016 Webby Award, and he won several Telly Awards for producing the long running documentary series, Working in the Theatre.

Currently in his eighth year developing and running digital strategy for the Tony Awards, he has helped to launch live streaming, near live, and sharable content on social media platforms, websites, and in venue.

Weiss produced the documentary Up Heartbreak Hill which premiered on PBS’s Point-of-View series in 2011. He has also worked as a Producer and Casting Director for hundreds of television and radio spots.

Weiss is a graduate of New York University.

 


 

What video/television piece inspired you recently?

I’m obsessed with what Aziz Ansari and Alan Young have done with the second season of Master of None. The nuance and specificity of each episode has really extended what television can do in terms of storytelling, diversity, and art.

What is most exciting you at the moment within your industry?

The constant influence that users and digital marketers have on the platforms. Whenever I work directly with a platform, they really listen to constructive criticism and new ideas. I think that’s often motivated by the fact that they are also users of social media and want the same improvements and experience that goes with the changing world.

What is one thing the Telly Awards community should know about you?

I’m a “best idea wins” person, so I love meeting digital folks who are super passionate about their careers, creating content, and activating partnerships. It’s especially amazing to see the juxtaposition of people who have been involved in professionally creating content from the start of the platform movement, and those who have done it since they were really young and are now getting started professionally. Those worlds colliding often has a great impact on brands and storytelling.

What is a piece of work you are most proud to have worked on?

We are mostly known for our Working in the Theatre documentary series which, in addition to several Telly Awards, was just nominated for a Daytime Emmy. Our episode on Sign Language Theatre from last year has taught me so much about the incredible work that the deaf community has created in theatre. It is also a reminder of the constant struggle that those who are deaf or living with one of many disabilities face in receiving the same treatment for employment and creating new work. I think video content has such great power to educate and entertain simultaneously.